Omega Schools

UNICEF Winner
Omega Schools is a chain of almost 40 low-cost private schools in Ghana. Key characteristics are a daily, all-inclusive fee model and curriculum developed in-house including daily teacher lesson plans and student workbooks.
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Year launched: 
2009
Launch country: 

CEI Plus Status

Program Results Status
Monitoring and Evaluation Reporting
Primary Approach: 
Implementer: 
Omega Schools Ltd.
Primary Topic: 

Location Data

State/Province: 
Greater Accra, Central
Geography type: 
Program Description: 

Omega Schools is a chain of almost 40 low-cost private schools located in the Greater Accra and Central regions of Ghana, serving over 20,000 students in nursery through Junior High School. It is the only chain of low-cost private schools in West Africa. Omega has developed a "school-in-a-box" approach that enables them to add new schools to the chain in a quick and systematic way. This approach includes detailed school operations manuals and systems in addition to standardized teaching and learning materials. Key components of the model include a daily, all-inclusive fee of 1.50 Ghana cedis (approximately $0.75) that allows families who might not be able to accumulate enough savings to pay a monthly or term fee to attend. This fee includes uniforms, a school bag, work books and exercise books, and a hot daily lunch. 

Omega's head office in Kasoa employs Ghanaian and international staff that develop daily teacher lesson plans, student work books, and assessments for each grade and subject; these materials are used in all schools and are aligned with the national curriculum. Omega teachers are senior high school graduates who receive one week of pre-service training and approximately 2-3 day per term of in-service training.

The Omega school day is 7 hours long compared to a typical government school day of 4 hours. Each student is given 15 free school days per year (5 per term), and there is also a scholarship program in place to help the least advantaged students pay for a portion of their fees. Omega is also developing systems to collect and analyze student demographic information in order to assess and improve their ability to reach the poorest. Omega uses internal assessments to measure the learning outcomes of their students and has a standardized feedback mechanism to inform schools and teachers of their students' performance. Omega has participated in an initial comparative study of student achievement with other low-cost private schools and government schools, and plans to continue to do so each year.

The Omega Schools chain has low overhead and a low break-even point: a school is typically self sustaining once it has 500 students, which most of the schools do within a few months of opening. The chain broke even at enrollment of 6,000 students.