Digital Divide Data

DDD’s approach is unique in that it incorporates a comprehensive program of employment and higher education to support high school graduates without the means of pursuing a college degree in realizing their dreams.
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Year launched: 
2001
Launch country: 

CEI Plus Status

Program Results Status
Monitoring and Evaluation Reporting
Primary Approach: 
Implementer: 
Digital Divide Data
Primary Topic: 
Education level (ISCED): 

Location Data

Geography type: 
Additional country(ies) of operation: 
Region(s) for additional countries if different from launch country region: 
Program Description: 

Digital Divide Data (DDD) delivers digital content, data and research services to clients worldwide, while enabling talented youth from low-income families to access professional opportunities and earn lasting higher income. This model, pioneered by DDD in 2001, is now called “Impact Sourcing” and has been implemented by dozens of firms around the world. DDD’s approach is unique in that it incorporates a comprehensive program of employment and higher education to support high school graduates without the means of pursuing a college degree to obtain college degrees, professional careers and lasting higher incomes.

There are an equal number of male and female participants in the program. DDD also makes an effort to recruit people living with disabilities across its owned offices. The initial training focuses on ICT, English and soft skills, lasts between 3 and 8 months. Upon graduating from DDD training, trainees can be hired by DDD and are encouraged to pursue higher education paid for through a combination of scholarships from DDD, salary from work at DDD and loans.

After graduating from university, DDD employees can continue working at DDD or often go on to bring their skills to other employers. The majority of DDD’s monitoring and evaluation focuses on the program’s impact on the quality of life of DDD graduates. The skills that DDD graduates gain as part of the DDD program allow them to earn roughly four times more than the average citizen in Cambodia, Laos and Kenya and as a result, they break the cycle of poverty. Since 2001, DDD’s program has increased lifetime earnings for youth in Cambodia, Laos and Kenya by a projected total of more than US$300 million.

Key Challenges: 
The key challenge for our program is to develop a financially sustainable model. Once we do this, we have the opportunity to reach more youth.